Wilmington City Schools lunch prices go up


Update given on Project Grit portraits

By Gary Huffenberger - [email protected]



East End Elementary School kindergarten children in the K 100 Club are, from left, John Bean, Jesse Brown, Ariah Heard, Destinee Drake, Mileigh Hollingsworth, Gunnar Martin and Brady DeBoard; and the kindergarten teachers in the back are, from left, Donna Adams and Amanda Kunkel. The honored students who were absent are Alayna Klontz, Alexis Randolph, Gabe Seiker and Sienna Hartley. Qualifying for the K 100 Club means an East End kindergartner can read more than 100 words and count higher than 100.


Wilmington City Schools student Griffin Snarr was chosen to be part of Project Grit. As one of 90 planned participants, his photo portrait will be printed on vinyl and publicly displayed later this year.


Long-time local school teacher Virgene Webb Peterson possesses grit.


A local pastor, Dow Tippett, holds a small wooden cross that bears the word “grit” as part of a participatory art project named Project Grit that honors passion, perseverance, resilience and stamina in the community.


WILMINGTON — Lunch prices for next school year will go up a dime at the Wilmington City Schools (WCS) elementary buildings and 15 cents at the middle and high schools.

An elementary-grades lunch will increase 10 cents to $2.60, and the middle/high school lunch will rise 15 cents to $3. Breakfast prices will remain the same.

The WCS Business Director Curt Bone asked Monday night for the board of education’s approval of the price changes to Type A (standard, as opposed to à la carte) school lunches, “as required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.”

Also at the meeting, local photographer Kim Law gave a presentation on a global participatory art project called Inside Out. The effort here stems from Denver Place Elementary School art teacher Doug Davis, who also attended Monday’s meeting.

A collaboration involving Law, Davis, middle school art teacher Jane Taylor and a committee of community members, the project will include photo portraits of Denver Place and Wilmington Middle School students as well as 40 community members. The goal is to display the photographs of those individuals on the walls of schools and other places in Wilmington.

The local project’s theme is “grit,” said Law, a character trait being stressed by Denver Elementary Principal Karen Long. Project Grit was formed, along with the following action statement. “The key to succeeding in life, for us in Wilmington, is passion, perseverance, resilience and stamina for long-term goals: Grit. Wilmington’s got grit!”

After referring to the 2008-09 loss of 8,000-plus jobs based at the air park, Law said, “Both young and old have been affected by what Wilmington has gone through. Project Grit salutes some who have been strong and passionate and resilient through this time — the unsung heroes.”

In principals reports to the board, Long said three more fifth-grade students were trained as new members of the Denver safety patrol squad, making the squad total 12 members who assist in arrival and dismissal.

There are 55 third-, fourth- and fifth-graders and eight Denver Place staff members participating in before and after school tutoring.

Nine Denver Place students from the Kinder Than Necessary Club served lunch at Your Father’s Kitchen in Wilmington on Saturday, Feb. 20.

Long also reported there have been three rounds of mini­-clubs that included Wilmington College athletes from lacrosse, soccer, baseball and softball, and craft ladies from the United Methodist Church. Teachers are donating their time to lead the clubs, which run for four weeks after school every Monday for an hour.

The clubs have included a cursive club, show choir, karaoke, board games and a history club.

Holmes Elementary School Principal Carrie Zeigler reported that winter tutoring is underway there. More than 80 students are receiving the extra support each week.

In January, Holmes students learned about Martin Luther King Jr. while completing a Kindness Matters Choiceboard at home. More than 125 students took part, said Zeigler, “completing over 1,000 acts of kindness in our community.”

The YMCA Before/After School Enrichment Program will begin on Monday, Feb. 29, Zeigler said. “As in the past, all elementary families can participate if they are looking for childcare,” she said.

The before-school daycare is from 6:30 to 9:15 a.m., and the after-school daycare from 4 to 6 p.m.

The Holmes Elementary School PTO Carnival — a fundraising event — will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 27.

In other news:

High school art teacher Michele Carr plans to retire at the end of the school year.

The school board accepted a $327 donation to Wilmington Middle School Project Trust from the Clinton County Foundation.

The board approved the employment of Jennifer Swindler as administrative assistant to the superintendent.

Reach Gary Huffenberger at 937-556-5768 or on Twitter @GHuffenberger.

East End Elementary School kindergarten children in the K 100 Club are, from left, John Bean, Jesse Brown, Ariah Heard, Destinee Drake, Mileigh Hollingsworth, Gunnar Martin and Brady DeBoard; and the kindergarten teachers in the back are, from left, Donna Adams and Amanda Kunkel. The honored students who were absent are Alayna Klontz, Alexis Randolph, Gabe Seiker and Sienna Hartley. Qualifying for the K 100 Club means an East End kindergartner can read more than 100 words and count higher than 100.
http://wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_kindergarten_p_f.jpgEast End Elementary School kindergarten children in the K 100 Club are, from left, John Bean, Jesse Brown, Ariah Heard, Destinee Drake, Mileigh Hollingsworth, Gunnar Martin and Brady DeBoard; and the kindergarten teachers in the back are, from left, Donna Adams and Amanda Kunkel. The honored students who were absent are Alayna Klontz, Alexis Randolph, Gabe Seiker and Sienna Hartley. Qualifying for the K 100 Club means an East End kindergartner can read more than 100 words and count higher than 100.

Wilmington City Schools student Griffin Snarr was chosen to be part of Project Grit. As one of 90 planned participants, his photo portrait will be printed on vinyl and publicly displayed later this year.
http://wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_g_snarr_f.jpgWilmington City Schools student Griffin Snarr was chosen to be part of Project Grit. As one of 90 planned participants, his photo portrait will be printed on vinyl and publicly displayed later this year.

Long-time local school teacher Virgene Webb Peterson possesses grit.
http://wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_v_peterson_2_f.jpgLong-time local school teacher Virgene Webb Peterson possesses grit.

A local pastor, Dow Tippett, holds a small wooden cross that bears the word “grit” as part of a participatory art project named Project Grit that honors passion, perseverance, resilience and stamina in the community.
http://wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_d_tippett_f.jpgA local pastor, Dow Tippett, holds a small wooden cross that bears the word “grit” as part of a participatory art project named Project Grit that honors passion, perseverance, resilience and stamina in the community.
Update given on Project Grit portraits

By Gary Huffenberger

[email protected]

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