What to know about prostate cancer


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To promote National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, several downtown Wilmington barbers assembled at the Foster J. Boyd, M.D., Regional Cancer Center - A Member of The James Cancer Network. Barber shops are a place where men communicate with one another, explained Wilmington Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Administrator Sharon Wilburn, who organized the promotional initiative. Symbolic blue bow ties are worn for the photograph to emphasize that prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. Seated in front from the left are Bill Evans who has experienced prostate cancer, and Dorothy Moore who helped sew the bow ties for the occasion; and in back from left are Wilburn, barber Ron Young of Ron’s Barber Shop, Clinton County Commissioner Patrick Haley, retired barber Dale Inwood, current barbers Scott Cumberland of Scotty’s, Dylan Collins of Oak Barber Shop, Tom Custis of Xenia Avenue Barber Shop, and Dr. Mark Collins, the director of medical oncology at the Foster Boyd Cancer Center.


Dr. Mark Collins


WILMINGTON — At the Foster J. Boyd, M.D., Regional Cancer Center – A Member of The James Cancer Network, prostate cancer is the fourth most common cancer they see.

September Is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Nationwide, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men, said Dr. Mark Collins, director of medical oncology at the Foster Boyd Cancer Center.

In conjunction with awareness month, Collins provided the following information.

About 80 percent of men are diagnosed with prostate cancer after they’re found to have an elevated PSA lab test. About 20 percent are diagnosed after an abnormal digital rectal exam.

Among types of cancer, prostate cancer is an area of great controversy in terms of management, including prostate cancer screening. In 2008, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against screening in men over age 75. More recently in 2012, USPSTF recommended against screening for all men.

Many physicians do not abide by the USPSTF recommendations. The initial intent was concern over patients being over-treated for a disease that is often non-threatening if caught early. But many feel that high-risk patients should still be screened.

High-risk patients include: a) patients who have a positive family history of prostate cancer; and b) African-American males if the screening applicant has a life expectancy of more than 10 years.

Most patients with prostate cancer who are diagnosed after an elevated PSA test have early stage disease, and usually they are free of symptoms.

If a biopsy is needed, it is usually done by a urologist trans-rectally, and is frequently done with ultra-sound guidance.

Once a patient is diagnosed with prostate cancer, Foster Boyd Cancer Center staff attempt to risk-stratify to determine who needs treatment as opposed to observation.

Risk-stratifying means to determine whether the patient has a low, intermediate, or a high risk of dying of prostate cancer.

Factors that determine risk include: a) extent of the disease seen on X-rays, plus the PSA value, and the Gleason score.

Depending on the risk assigned by your doctor, the treatment options include: a) observation; b) surgery which is radical prostatectomy; c) radiation therapy; and d) occasionally, testosterone suppression known as ADT (Androgene Deprivation Therapy). Chemotherapy is also an option.

There are about 180,000 new diagnoses of prostate cancer per year in the United States.

Most patients with early stage prostate cancer are asymptomatic — that is, they lack symptoms.

Many more men have symptoms that are related to an enlarged prostate, as opposed to having prostate cancer. However, only your doctor can tell the difference.

Note: The medical information above is provided as an information resource only, in connection with National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.

To promote National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, several downtown Wilmington barbers assembled at the Foster J. Boyd, M.D., Regional Cancer Center – A Member of The James Cancer Network. Barber shops are a place where men communicate with one another, explained Wilmington Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Administrator Sharon Wilburn, who organized the promotional initiative. Symbolic blue bow ties are worn for the photograph to emphasize that prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. Seated in front from the left are Bill Evans who has experienced prostate cancer, and Dorothy Moore who helped sew the bow ties for the occasion; and in back from left are Wilburn, barber Ron Young of Ron’s Barber Shop, Clinton County Commissioner Patrick Haley, retired barber Dale Inwood, current barbers Scott Cumberland of Scotty’s, Dylan Collins of Oak Barber Shop, Tom Custis of Xenia Avenue Barber Shop, and Dr. Mark Collins, the director of medical oncology at the Foster Boyd Cancer Center.
http://wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_blue_ties_f.jpgTo promote National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, several downtown Wilmington barbers assembled at the Foster J. Boyd, M.D., Regional Cancer Center – A Member of The James Cancer Network. Barber shops are a place where men communicate with one another, explained Wilmington Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Administrator Sharon Wilburn, who organized the promotional initiative. Symbolic blue bow ties are worn for the photograph to emphasize that prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. Seated in front from the left are Bill Evans who has experienced prostate cancer, and Dorothy Moore who helped sew the bow ties for the occasion; and in back from left are Wilburn, barber Ron Young of Ron’s Barber Shop, Clinton County Commissioner Patrick Haley, retired barber Dale Inwood, current barbers Scott Cumberland of Scotty’s, Dylan Collins of Oak Barber Shop, Tom Custis of Xenia Avenue Barber Shop, and Dr. Mark Collins, the director of medical oncology at the Foster Boyd Cancer Center.

Dr. Mark Collins
http://wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_Collins.jpgDr. Mark Collins

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